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 Post subject: Starting Sept 25th - Am I crazy?
PostPosted: Tue Sep 11, 2007 6:46 pm 
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Joined: Tue Oct 10, 2006 2:03 am
Posts: 115
Location: California, USA
Actually, I'm only walking from Pandy to Knighton (supposedly the best three days of the path), then jumping to Glyndwr's Way for the whole loop to Welshpool. All accomodations are now booked, quite a job since B&Bs are scarce in some places and prices seem to be a little higher west of the border, especially Machynlleth. The whole walk will be 182 miles, 12 walking days plus a 5 miler from Pandy to LLanthony on the first afternoon and a rest day in Mach. I feel like I'm going into virgin territory even though I have the National Trails Guide. I hope I have a better experience than Lonewalker.

Cheers, Gregg

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 12, 2007 5:29 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 29, 2006 2:51 pm
Posts: 961
Location: Cheshire, UK
Good luck Gregg.
I do hope you enjoy it more than I did.

I'm beginning to think that my head was in the wrong place when I started the walk and that contributed to the negative aspects as I perceived them and ultimately making all things seem much bleaker than they actually were. At the end of the day its a personal experience.

When you get back, let us know how you got on
Cheers
LW

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 Post subject: Offa's Dyke 2007
PostPosted: Fri Oct 19, 2007 2:26 pm 
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Joined: Fri Oct 19, 2007 12:01 pm
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Location: Buxton
Well, Lonewalker you don't know what you've missed!
I've just finished the Offa's Dyke walk and I must say it was spectacular in places. I know the first part is a struggle between Sedbury and Monmouth, due to the bad sign-posting/visibility through trees, but you should have given the walk a chance as there another 160 miles to see!
If you want views and scenery then, why don't you start the walk from Presatyn because the Clwydian hills are marvellous.
If anyone is contemplating on doing the walk, then I suggest splitting the Sedbury/Monmouth section into 2 days like I did and stop at either Brockweir or Tintern.
Also, there are cheap B & B's throughout the entire route, the cheapest I paid was £15.75. I would recommend this walk to anybody and the weather this October has been fantastic!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 20, 2007 3:16 am 
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Offa's Dyke, what can I say LW, except that I enjoyed it despite several thousand stiles in 3 1/2 days. After awhile, I learned to levitate over them!

The bus from Hereford deposited me at Pandy Inn about 2:30 pm. I crossed the road to the Lancaster Arms and found the ODP sign pointing across the field towards Hatterrall Hill. It's a nice view-filled climb to the trig point, about 1500 ft, then on to about 2000 ft where I descended steeply on Beacon's Way to Llanthony Priory and my B&B for the night, Half Moon Hotel. The next morning, George pointed the way back onto the ridge, a 1300 ft ascent in 1 1/2 miles. The ridge is very boggy and, today, cold, windy and rainy. But really a great walk the whole way. Sleet fell for 15 minutes so my earflaps and gloves came in handy. I met about 14 walkers, half on day walks, half doing the ODP. A Canadian couple from the Half Moon was about 1/2 hour behind me.

At the Hay Bluff trig point (2219 ft) a couple took my photo and I broke for lunch. My energy bar was almost frozen, had to break off peices with my teeth and let it warm up in my mouth. Off and on sun, great views in all directions, you can see nine counties in clear weather. It was a surprisingly easy descent from Hay Bluff, or Pen y Beacon, then 4 miles to Hay on Wye. I lost the path after a stone wall (poor waymarking) but found it further on. Belmont House was a good B&B choice and I ate at the Black Lion where my wife and I ate 5 years ago.

Next morning, off by 9 am, a nice day. A good path above the River Wye through trees, then a locked gate. What's up? An Australian couple came up behind me and pointed to a stile and sign half hidden in the hedge 10 meters behind me. They had a guidebook, I only had a map. We walked together the rest of the day. It was varied terrain of woods, pastures, and ridges, down to villages and back up. No dyke to walk on today, but first class walking country. On Hergest Ridge, six very odd looking trees, fenced off with a "craftsman" bench. They are possibly an ancient variety of yew tree. We descended into Kington where I tried to find Hergest Court where the Mabinogion was stored for centuries, but discovered it was 2 miles out of town. My B&B host Geoff had a photo, a 15th century timber frame house, part of a farm. The farm family now lives in a newer house, only 250 years old.

Leaving Kington in the morning, straight up the hill to the highest golf course in England, dodging golf balls at over 1200 ft. Climbing higher to Rushock Hill, I came to a stile w/waymark and met a farmer on his ATV who tells me "this is the wrong stile, ODP has been rerouted to the stile 200 ft on your left, this will take you into oblivion". He was right, but why was the old waymark still there? I then gained my first section of the actual dyke although rather small. Around Herrock Hill and across the Vale of Radnor, both quite beautiful, through woods and onto the dyke again. This section was quite impressive. Near Dolly Green, a fighter jet buzzed me about 100 ft overhead. He was over the next range of hills before I could blink. Up, up, up over Furrow Hill and Hawthorne Hill, then more dyke walking.

This day was up and down constantly, many long steep ascents. I was glad I was only carrying 15 pounds in my pack. Nevertheless, for the first time ever my calves were burning as I neared Knighton. I checked into the Horse and Jockey, a 15th century coaching inn, a wonderful choice. A comfortable, stylish room and excellent food, a good place to prepare for Glyndwr's Way on the morrow.

Cheers, Gregg

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